Media literacy – Crest Web Media http://www.crestwebmedia.net/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:49:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Media literacy – Crest Web Media http://www.crestwebmedia.net/ 32 32 How integrating media literacy and classroom education can help students learn to “read the world” http://www.crestwebmedia.net/how-integrating-media-literacy-and-classroom-education-can-help-students-learn-to-read-the-world/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 09:04:57 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/how-integrating-media-literacy-and-classroom-education-can-help-students-learn-to-read-the-world/ An Open Letter to Educators: How Can We Help Students Learn to “Read the World” Dear fellow educators, I am an educator with over two decades of English Language Teaching (ELT) experience and a keen interest in media education. Recently, while discussing the film Jai Bhim with some educators i suggested discussing it in class […]]]>

An Open Letter to Educators: How Can We Help Students Learn to “Read the World”

Dear fellow educators,

I am an educator with over two decades of English Language Teaching (ELT) experience and a keen interest in media education. Recently, while discussing the film Jai Bhim with some educators i suggested discussing it in class as part of media literacy. This received a mixed reaction.

Jai Bhim is based on an actual incident from the 1990s when three members of a listed tribe (irregular community) were arrested and tortured in police custody. One of the detainees died in custody and his wife, with the help of a High Court lawyer, fought for justice. The inspiration for the protagonist is Judge Chandru who, as a lawyer, fought a legal battle against those in power and helped the marginalized obtain justice.

In short, the film deals with caste discrimination, dehumanization, social inequalities, police brutality, torture in detention, human rights violations, the legal battle for justice, homework. and constitutional rights, etc. The film raises several ethical questions.

Read the world

Some may wonder how this socio-political film relates to education and why students should know about it or discuss it in class? What is the goal or purpose of education? It is about helping students become aware of what is happening in their community and in society in general, to create an environment conducive to their critical thinking and to encourage them to contribute constructively to society. A critical view of this film and a discussion of its various aspects can help students learn to “read the world”. I borrow this sentence from that of the Brazilian educator Paulo Freire Literacy: Reading the Word and the World.

Here are some sample questions to discuss after watching the film: What aspects did you like or dislike most? What impact did the film have on you? What is your critical response to the history / portrayal of caste discrimination? Do you think the director did the real story justice? What is your comment on the judicial system in the country? Why are people of certain castes oppressed by ruling castes? Is there a bias in the film? By discussing these elements objectively, students can develop critical thinking skills.

As educators, not just teachers, we have a social and moral responsibility to help students not only “read the word”, but also “read the world”. We can help students by integrating media education into the classroom.

Media literacy is the process that helps students become critical and informed receivers of content and enables them to identify biases. Behind every media message, there is a global model. Encouraging students to identify the pattern and enabling them to understand how the patterns reinforce certain ideas, values ​​and social norms is the responsibility of media educators. Media education enables students to understand how media works and helps them realize the impact of media (mass media and social media) on their lives.

Today in the age of social media, we are bombarded with viral memes, tweets, news, views and videos. There is a flood of information as well as disinformation / disinformation that we receive every day from mainstream and social media. It affects us in many ways and influences the way we think. It forces us to have a certain view of the world. Unless students are taught to analyze content with a keen eye, they will be misinformed and misled.

Dear educators, we have a moral responsibility to help our students learn to “read the world”. Helping them “read the word” is easy, but empowering them to “read the world” is a challenge. As educators, we must be prepared to take on challenges.

The author is an ELT resource person and an education columnist. rayanal@yahoo.co.uk


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Combating disinformation through media literacy http://www.crestwebmedia.net/combating-disinformation-through-media-literacy/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 10:50:00 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/combating-disinformation-through-media-literacy/ AMID efforts to curb the pandemic with the rollout of vaccines, the World Health Organization has also expressed concern over the misinformation that has taken place online. Referred to as an infodemic, a hanger of “information” and “epidemic,” it usually refers to false or misleading information – this time leading to hesitation in vaccination. In […]]]>

AMID efforts to curb the pandemic with the rollout of vaccines, the World Health Organization has also expressed concern over the misinformation that has taken place online.

Referred to as an infodemic, a hanger of “information” and “epidemic,” it usually refers to false or misleading information – this time leading to hesitation in vaccination.

In addition, calls have also been made to make media and communication studies a compulsory subject, starting in high school, to educate the public about the danger of fake news.

Nur Leila Khalid, professor of media and communication studies at the Asia-Pacific University of Technology and Innovation (APU), shares this sentiment.

“It would be a good move as more and more children are exposed to media at a younger age,” she said, noting that with the rise of social media, sharing news without verifying the source has become more normal among Internet users.

So, it is of course important that professional journalism is promoted along with media education. Media literacy is a skill set that enables people to deconstruct media content, critically analyze it, or even identify the underlying messages, its ownership and regulation, and how it is handled. is present.

Fahizah Shamsuddin, head of the APU Media and Communication Studies Program, recognizes that media literacy is something that needs to be mainstreamed into public consciousness.

This knowledge can be applied to any case studies or field studies encompassing communications, public relations, advertising, journalism and research.

“APU students acquire media education training through modules such as Contemporary Media Studies, Crisis Communication and Journalism,” she adds.

Such training could encourage students to think independently and question what is ‘fed’ to them, while emphasizing the skills and knowledge necessary to understand and manage an environment dominated by social media.

Nur Leila further explains: “In university education, major media-related topics include ethical considerations in media, as well as the history and theory of verification in journalism.

Means of verifying information and sources must take into account the effects of rapidly changing digital technology, online behavior and information-gathering techniques.

Important soft skills in media literacy include:

> Be ready to make an effort to understand and filter the content disseminated

> Have a full understanding of the messages, including their objectives

> Be able to distinguish emotion when responding to content and act accordingly

> Develop increased expectations regarding media content

> Critical reflection on media messages

> Know the internal language of the different media and understand its effects

The APU also emphasizes a well-balanced education between the theoretical and practical aspects of their media and communication studies.

In addition, his media education training provides students and teachers with a common approach to critical thinking, increasing their ability and fluency in communication and the dissemination of their thoughts.

Upon graduation, graduates well equipped with such professional training can opt for careers in journalism, writing, communications, brand management, campaign development, advertising, and media promotion or sales.

Upon graduation, graduates entering the workforce will ultimately impart media literacy to the real world, thereby developing the citizenship skills needed to form a healthier society.Upon graduation, graduates entering the workforce will ultimately impart media literacy to the real world, thereby developing the citizenship skills needed to form a healthier society.

Regarding career prospects, Fahizah says, “Communication is one of the fastest growing areas in today’s career market. Many of the jobs currently in demand in the media did not even exist 15 years ago.

“Organizations today need skilled communicators to help them get their messages across to the public. Whether they work among business leaders, bureaucrats or the creatives of the digital age, our students and alumni are ahead of the curve, ”she says.

The data speaks for itself, because according to the latest annual graduate tracking survey from the Ministry of Higher Education, 100% of APU graduates are employed after graduation.

The Bachelor of Arts (Honors) in Media and Communication Studies offered by APU is more than just a degree in Media and Communication Studies, as registered students will have the opportunity to apply for the L5 award. from the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom). in management and leadership.

Apart from this, students can also choose to enroll in the APU-DMU dual degree program, which means that they will receive two certificates and transcripts upon graduation, one from the APU and the another from De Montfort University in the United Kingdom.

For more information on the program, visit www.apu.edu.my.


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Media Literacy Training of Trainers Fellowship Program http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-training-of-trainers-fellowship-program/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 13:32:53 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-training-of-trainers-fellowship-program/ Summary UK media education charities are invited to bid for the £ 150,000 Training of Trainers Grant pilot program. This program aims to help media education organizations adapt their teaching materials for teachers working with children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). We expect offers to range from £ 5,000 to £ 75,000, but […]]]>

Summary

UK media education charities are invited to bid for the £ 150,000 Training of Trainers Grant pilot program. This program aims to help media education organizations adapt their teaching materials for teachers working with children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). We expect offers to range from £ 5,000 to £ 75,000, but offers of all sizes will be considered as part of the program.

Eligibility

How to register

To apply for this grant program, please complete the application form attached to this webpage and send it to medialiteracy@dcms.gov.uk. Applications will be open until November 29, 2021, 23:59 GMT. We will endeavor to notify applicants of the outcome of the grant program during the week of December 20, but timelines may be subject to change.

If you have any questions about this grant program or the application process, please contact medialiteracy@dcms.gov.uk. The Department of Digital Culture, Media and Sports (DCMS) will be hosting information sessions for applicants during the week of November 15, 2021. If you would like to attend, please register your interest with the mailbox. letters.

Project requirements

DCMS is committed to creating an inclusive approach to online security. This pilot grant program is intended to fund organizations that already have experience supporting teachers in media education, to adapt and adapt their teaching materials for teachers working with SEND children. The program is open to projects targeting children of any age group, or with any type of SEND. We expect offers to range from £ 20,000 to £ 75,000, but offers of all sizes will be considered as part of the program.

Projects funded by this grant program must have the following results:

  • adapting media literacy teaching materials suitable for teachers working with SEND children
  • production of evaluation data on the effectiveness of such material in developing teachers and building media literacy capacities in children with SEND
  • production of an evaluation report describing the evaluation methodology and data

The grant period will begin in January 2022 (subject to application processing times) and should be completed by the end of March 2022. Funds received under the grant program can be used to adapt and test equipment, however due to time constraints. it will not cover the delivery of materials to teachers. Applicants must demonstrate how they will use and provide the appropriate material beyond the end of the grant period in their application forms.

Application criteria

Applicants are invited to submit a project proposal by completing the application form attached to this webpage and sending it to medialiteracy@dcms.gov.uk

The projects submitted to the program will be evaluated according to the following essential criteria:

  • applicants must have UK registered charity status
  • applicants must have experience providing media education
  • applicants should bid on projects costing between £ 20,000 and £ 150,000
  • the development and adaptation of teaching materials should be suitable for teachers working with SEND children. This can focus on children of any age group, with any type of SEND
  • applications must demonstrate how the educational material has been specially designed to support SEND children
  • teaching material should relate to one or more areas of media education, primarily with an emphasis on online safety
  • Projects should include plans to assess the effectiveness of teaching materials in teacher development and in building media literacy capacity in children with SEND. The evaluation of applications will have a preference for projects with strong evaluation methodologies
  • applications must indicate how the educational material created in the project will be delivered beyond the end of the grant period
  • applications must have plans for project delivery by the end of March 2022

It is desirable that :

  • applicants have previous work experience to develop teachers
  • applicants have previous experience / expertise working with SEND requirements
  • project evaluation plans go beyond self-reported data

Entries will be evaluated to determine if they offer good value for money. Projects that seek large amounts of funding without demonstrating commensurate results are unlikely to be successful. Projects with suspected fraudulent costs will not be accepted into the grant program.

Background information

In July 2021, DCMS released the Online Media Literacy Strategy, which sets out our ambition to improve national media literacy capabilities. The UK has a rich media education landscape with over 170 organizations providing educational initiatives to users. However, a recent mapping exercise revealed that there were significant gaps in educational material for certain user groups, for example, only 4% of initiatives targeted users with disabilities. We are committed to creating a more inclusive media education landscape by encouraging organizations to fill gaps in the landscape and deliver more educational initiatives to vulnerable user groups.

One of the policy objectives of the Online Media Literacy Strategy is to improve access to age-appropriate and capacity-appropriate media education support for these excluded user groups, such as than children with SEND. These children often receive support from the professionals they work with in the field of protection and well-being, but our engagement suggests that this support rarely extends to individuals’ online lives. We know that one of these key groups of professionals are teachers. The engagement highlighted that teachers can face this problem for a number of reasons:

  • lack of self-confidence to facilitate these conversations in class
  • limited media literacy skills
  • lack of time to devote to discussing media literacy
  • uncertainty as to which resources to use and whether they will have an impact

We want to build skills and enable teachers to be able to talk about media education with their students and integrate the consideration of online safety into protection practices. We have already seen some organizations start to take steps to improve teachers’ media literacy skills.

However, this activity is largely focused on supporting teachers working in mainstream education. There is an even greater barrier for teachers working with SEND children, as there are a very limited number of available resources tailored to the needs of these children. Teachers should have access to media education resources specifically designed for children with SEND. This may include:

  • lesson plans taught in a format that can accommodate shorter attention spans
  • content that covers age-appropriate issues but is suitable for children with an early age to read
  • content that addresses issues to which children with SEND may be more vulnerable, such as online abuse

This grant program has been set up to support organizations that offer media education activities to expand their activity to support teachers with SEND children.

Media Literacy Training of Trainers Program Grant Application Form (ODT, 16.5 KB)


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Media Literacy in the Online Safety Bill: Sacrificing Citizenship for Resilience? http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-in-the-online-safety-bill-sacrificing-citizenship-for-resilience/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-in-the-online-safety-bill-sacrificing-citizenship-for-resilience/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 13:15:40 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-in-the-online-safety-bill-sacrificing-citizenship-for-resilience/ The UK Online Safety Bill, released by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport in May 2021 and currently under the control of a small parliamentary committee, aims to establish a new regulatory framework to combat harmful content online. Here, Professor Lee Edwards of the LSE analyzes how media education is presented in the […]]]>

The UK Online Safety Bill, released by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport in May 2021 and currently under the control of a small parliamentary committee, aims to establish a new regulatory framework to combat harmful content online. Here, Professor Lee Edwards of the LSE analyzes how media education is presented in the bill and suggests how the bill’s proposals could be strengthened.

In the online security bill, media education is an important place to raise awareness of harmful content and potentially give users of online services strategies to recognize and combat disinformation. Although questions have been raised about its presentation in the bill and the assumptions it makes about Ofcom’s capabilities, the provisions extend Ofcom’s media literacy obligations – previously set out in the Communications Act 2003 – in three important ways. These new obligations are:

  • Encourage the development of technologies that allow users to identify disinformation and control the information they receive;
  • “To carry out, commission or encourage educational initiatives” which support media literacy;
  • Prepare guidelines for the evaluation of media education initiatives.

The new obligations help to clarify some of the more general provisions of the previous law (for example, by clarifying how to interpret the “nature and characteristics” of content, and how the idea of ​​awareness and understanding is to be interpreted). These obligations give Ofcom more power to influence both organizational governance and investments related to media education, as well as to shape media literacy education curricula. As such, they enhance the regulator’s potential to assert the value of media literacy among media producers and those who support user engagement with the media.

However, the new bill also includes a subtle but crucial wording change, from a requirement to improve the awareness and understanding of the “public” of the media to raising the awareness of “members of the public”. The first requires Ofcom to improve our collective levels of media literacy and critical engagement with media content, while the second is an obligation to improve individual levels of media literacy.

The wording change is consistent with the focus on individual harms in the bill and certainly eases the obligation to assess media literacy – it is easier to measure outcomes in terms of behaviors and abilities individual than to identify collective empowerment. However, adjustment risks sacrificing one of the main advantages of media literacy: its ability to support citizens who are informed, engaged, ready to participate in deliberations and debates in our democratic processes. While this may not be the intention behind the change, the effect is inevitable when media education is incorporated into a bill primarily focused on the regulation of platforms and providers.

Additionally, more specific interpretations of ‘technologies and systems’ that enhance media literacy aim to facilitate the ability of users to identify types of content, determine its reliability and accuracy, and control how they receive content. information. These accents prioritize the ability to detect disinformation, rather than the ability to critically engage with the media more broadly. Yet media literacy interventions that can contribute to critical thinking and evaluation most often take a systems approach: they include learning about how media is produced and consumed, understanding media industries. and their institutional power and priorities, the critique of media representations and the development of the capacity to create media. Fostering this type of media education can have a positive effect on our ability to actively engage in online information, the power of the media, and to recognize our own voices as citizens. The bill runs the risk of turning this capacity-building literacy into an exercise in informed consumption. If media education is deployed alone as a mode of self-protection against exploitation or harm, its potential to support our deliberative and democratic capacities could be seriously weakened.

These two questions highlight a more fundamental problem with the bill: the focus on users rather than citizens and on mitigating individual rather than collective harm. Yet the bill focuses on issues that directly affect our collective well-being. Living in a society where information and knowledge remain balanced, reliable and accessible to all, or where our desire to communicate our experiences is not tempered by fears of hatred and intolerance, is in our common interest. Harm occurs not only when individuals are damaged by online interactions, but also when those same interactions escalate, ultimately reducing our critical capacities and generating antagonistic arguments rather than agonistic debate in society. We have already seen the results of this type of polarization in increased nationalism, the reification of disinformation and the dismissal of experts, and a gradual weakening of democratic arrangements that rely on engaged and informed citizens.

Despite this, the bill imagines users primarily as atomized individuals rather than as social beings living in relationship to one another. The corollary of media literacy suggested by the bill is that collective benefits are subordinate to individual resilience. If this framing of media literacy becomes the dominant mode of delivery, there is a risk that the perception of its broader value to society will gradually dissipate. While a critical analysis of the power of platforms is desperately needed on the part of all citizens, the instrumentalization of media literacy is worrying at best, and dangerous at worst – potentially leading to further political polarization and to an even lower resilience to disinformation than we currently have.

There are options to mitigate this danger:

  • The wording of the bill could be changed to go back to “public” rather than “members of the public”, for example.
  • The specifications of the bill could be broadened to include the broader critical capacities that are so fundamental to our deliberative engagement.

However, claims about the need to support collective welfare and media literacy would be more strongly articulated under digital rights, and the lack of such rights is a more fundamental issue with the bill.

During our summer roundtable, Professor Sonia Livingstone and MP Chi Onwurah both strongly advocated for the inclusion of an explicit digital rights bill in the bill, as the foundation for online security. . Even though such rights are not included in the final version, they are undoubtedly necessary. The intensive discussions about citizenship, media literacy, due diligence, and the need to protect freedom of expression have all arisen in part because we lack a framework against which these issues can be referenced in a context. digital world. Existing human rights declarations are difficult to transplant as such into digital contexts, due to the changed environment in which they exist. Digital rights have to cope with the different architectures, actors and network dynamics of digital spaces, and are not easy to adjust – as demonstrated by the long process of drafting the UN General Comment 25 on children’s rights in relation to the digital environment. But our digital rights need to be addressed by both civil society and politicians, if initiatives like the Online Safety Bill are to be legitimate, sustainable and ultimately successfully implemented, and if the societal value of media education must be preserved.

This article gives the author’s point of view and does not represent the position of the Media @ LSE blog, nor of the London School of Economics and Political Science.


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College Newsrooms Should Help Fix Media Literacy http://www.crestwebmedia.net/college-newsrooms-should-help-fix-media-literacy/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/college-newsrooms-should-help-fix-media-literacy/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 07:47:19 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/college-newsrooms-should-help-fix-media-literacy/ Illinois’ The recently passed Education Media Literacy Act does not apply to college newsrooms, but college-aged journalists can – and should – contribute to media literacy in communities communities by increasing transparency about our journalistic practices and the standards of our organizations. Illinois became the first state to require information literacy classes in every high […]]]>

Illinois’ The recently passed Education Media Literacy Act does not apply to college newsrooms, but college-aged journalists can – and should – contribute to media literacy in communities communities by increasing transparency about our journalistic practices and the standards of our organizations.

Illinois became the first state to require information literacy classes in every high school, passing a law making the program mandatory in August. According to House Bill 234, media literacy is “the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create and communicate using a variety of forms”. It was adopted in response to growing misinformation surrounding the pandemic and the 2020 electoral cycle, and aims to equip students with the tools to discern what information is trustworthy.

While the New York Times and Wall Street Journal plans are useful, tailoring them to the needs of college communities is paramount because of the unique relationships college journalists have with the communities we cover. For example, due to our proximity (and sometimes our belonging) to local communities, it is easy for readers to assume that personal experience spills over into prejudices and conflicts of interest. However, there are internal regulations that prevent this from happening – they are simply not made public.

After looking at the Wall Street Journal’s guide to reading news, I noticed some content that might alleviate the aforementioned problem. Short standards and ethics videos that explain the line between opinion and news, along with explanations of how clearly labeled advertising does not conflict with articles, help consumers understand what hides behind the content they see.

For a college newsroom, the walkthroughs of the editorial process – from pitching to fact-checking to print layout – could clear up any confusion about the content. In the past, we have taken steps to address some of these issues through our “From the press roomBut there are still steps we can and must take to deepen this education of our reporting and publishing processes for our readers.

One problem we face in covering a hyperlocal area is that we have to compete with word of mouth, in addition to social media. While news travels quickly, the emphasis on transparency behind our fact-checking process can draw readers to us for more in-depth and accurate reporting. It also gives us a chance to engage with the same strategies the New York Times used to correct media literacy: making journalists more accessible.

In partnership with The News Literacy Project, The New York Times runs calls and in-class classes with their own reporters to bridge the gap between reporters and the community, something college-aged reporters are almost too familiar with. College journalists can take advantage of this by acting as ambassadors for their publications and explaining the culture and protocol where applicable.

When Suzi Watford, the Wall Street Journal’s marketing and membership editor, discussed the WSJ’s new literacy guide in an interview with the National Press Club’s Institute for Journalism, she pointed out that all readers do not have the same level of judgment on information. As a result, she said the guides provide an applicable and accessible level of knowledge base. Not everyone thinks about the news all the time, and as a result, the ins and outs of our industry are often left to guesswork – and that’s a fact that we journalists need to anchor within ourselves.

The issue of media literacy is a multi-faceted issue that touches on trust, transparency and clarity. It is the responsibility of members of the media to do what we can to repair the flaws in the media literacy of the community we serve. Through media literacy initiatives, student publications can gain dedicated readers who appreciate the facts provided by reputable journalists.

Alex Perry is a second year economics and journalism student. You can contact her at [email protected]. If you would like to respond publicly to this editorial, send a letter to the editor at [email protected]. The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect the opinions of all staff at The Daily Northwestern.


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Media literacy is key to tackling violence to which children are exposed http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-is-key-to-tackling-violence-to-which-children-are-exposed/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-is-key-to-tackling-violence-to-which-children-are-exposed/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 15:04:08 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-is-key-to-tackling-violence-to-which-children-are-exposed/ The South Korean Dystopian Series Squid game has become Netflix’s most-watched TV series, but there have been growing calls to stop children from watching it to prevent them from emulating its violent challenges. However, seasoned broadcaster Peppi Azzopardi believes the solution lies in education, not banning Squid Game or other violent content to which children […]]]>

The South Korean Dystopian Series Squid game has become Netflix’s most-watched TV series, but there have been growing calls to stop children from watching it to prevent them from emulating its violent challenges.

However, seasoned broadcaster Peppi Azzopardi believes the solution lies in education, not banning Squid Game or other violent content to which children are exposed.

Speaking on Andrew Azzopardi’s talk show on 103 Malta’s Heart, the former Xarabank presenter said that “the solution is not to prevent children from watching something but to prepare them to read it and to interpret them “.

Emphasizing the importance of introducing media literacy into the school curriculum, Azzopardi said that “we have to teach children to be critical, not to believe everything they are told, to understand war …”

He added that the danger is when people call for a boycott or condemn violent series or games because they add to their appeal.

Arguing that such content has desensitized violence, Azzopardi said “I am worried about the normalization of violence” which he believes could lead to the trivialization of society and immunity from violence in real life. .

Artificial intelligence expert Alexei Dingli shared the point of view of Azzopardi, the former mayor of Valletta saying “we should not underestimate” the ability of children to understand and discern what they are looking at. television or online.

He said that previous generations were also exposed to violence and insisted that the problem is not exclusively due to parenthood, as children are exposed to all kinds of content on platforms such as TikTok, YouTube. , Instagram and other apps.

“The problem isn’t just that kids are watching things they shouldn’t be watching, because it’s up to parents to set boundaries and educate. The problem is with the content they are inadvertently exposed to… parents cannot control such cases.

He added that the most worrying aspect is the lack of education and said children are more than able to distinguish between fact and fiction.

While agreeing on the need to empower children, Councilor Joseph Pellicano argued that children need adults to process and understand what they see on TV or online.

Recently, several Maltese schools have urged parents to prevent their children from watching Squid game while students as young as five are said to have copied the show’s violent games.

Recognizing that Netflix, YouTube and other apps are an integral part of everyday life, Pellicano said, “Ultimately, the more children are exposed to violence, the greater the likelihood that they will be immune to it.” .

Pellicano added that “some media are harmful” and transferred the responsibility to parents who leave children unattended or, in some cases, watch violent content with children.

When asked if being exposed to violence at a young age will make future generations more violent, Pellicano said studies show that young boys exposed to violence are 50% more likely to inflict domestic violence to their partners in adulthood.

Neuropsychiatrist and academic Kristina Bettenzana said research on the long-term effect of violent content on children is inconclusive and ongoing, but said people are influenced by what they see and watch, but the extent of the impact

However, Bettenzana added that exposure to violence has’ other impacts, on sleep patterns, relationships and socialization. It is not only about violence, but it also affects other aspects of children’s lives.

Watch the full discussion below:


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Media literacy helps dispel fake news http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-helps-dispel-fake-news/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-helps-dispel-fake-news/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 21:00:00 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-helps-dispel-fake-news/ A man looks out of his home next to a poster urging the public not to participate in spreading fake news in Hanoi, Vietnam. (Photo: AFP) To combat fake news and other forms of disinformation, the best arsenal is Media and Information Education (MIL). Unlike legality, MIL relies directly on user awareness. If other solutions […]]]>

A man looks out of his home next to a poster urging the public not to participate in spreading fake news in Hanoi, Vietnam. (Photo: AFP)

To combat fake news and other forms of disinformation, the best arsenal is Media and Information Education (MIL). Unlike legality, MIL relies directly on user awareness. If other solutions are not without interest, their shortcomings quickly appear.

The ever-increasing use of social media websites and related applications, coupled with the decline of more traditional news sources over the past decade, has been accompanied by a dramatic increase in disinformation online.

The Covid-19 pandemic crisis has seen a drastic increase in this phenomenon and has generated what the World Health Organization (WHO) has termed an “infodemic”.

Taiwan provides an excellent example of an illegal fight against disinformation, and the “infodemic” in particular. Instead of passing “fake news” legislation, the government is using transparent, readable, prompt and independent fact-checking.

Based on the principles of “quick, fair and fun,” Taiwan recognizes that responses to counter-disinformation have the most impact when they are made within an hour of the disinformation being spread.

The responses, which usually come in the form of memes and pictures, are designed to grab attention first, before introducing facts that contradict the false information. Taiwan’s experience shows that in the face of an infodemic, a confident and founded government, associated with informed citizens, is the best defense.

The infodemic thrives in the absence of credible and transparent information. The latter situation arose in Japan, for example. Under the Covid-19 (SOE) state of emergency, journalists’ access to government press conferences has narrowed.

However, governments have the highest ethical and legal responsibility to ensure that citizens have access to accurate and reliable information. Accordingly, a healthy and independent media environment is necessary to prevent government-run sources of information from turning into state propaganda.

An effective IME urges citizens to recognize potentially problematic sources of information early. The latter includes the recognition of “fact-checking” agencies set up by several governments.

For example, Malaysia’s Ministry of Communication and Multimedia established Sebenarnya.my in 2017. However, critics immediately pointed out that the fact-checking website was promoting the government’s version of the truth and lacking in ‘objectivity. The risk is that the government’s so-called “fact-checking” is just a way to stifle criticism. MIL provides the necessary critical thinking skills that inspire citizens to recognize credible and independent sources of information.

Civil society organizations such as Mafindo in Indonesia have sought to counter this risk by forming independent fact-checking networks. These offer citizens a portal to verify the information they read online and report questionable information. However, most of these investigative organizations suffer from insufficient funding and human resources, preventing them from sifting through the amount of information being shared every second on the internet and social media.

Technology companies have recently created tools and processes for users to report harmful content. As with fact-checking, however, their responses are logically responsive, removing content that has been flagged. By the time the content is removed from the platform, it has been shared widely and may already be out of control.

During the Covid-19 pandemic, Facebook opened a Covid-19 information center and automatically added a warning link to any post mentioning Covid-19. While this systematic redirection to reliable information is laudable, its blind targeting quickly rendered it ineffective as users grew accustomed to the warning.

Reliable and usable MIL requires conveying a minimal understanding of the technologies deployed by tech companies, especially new technologies such as artificial intelligence and algorithms, to attract citizens to preferred content and to bogus and misleading content that is detrimental – all in the name of advertising revenue and data collection.

Google has claimed to fight against fake news by raising quality journalism on their platforms: their search engine ranks the results of news queries by relevance and authority. The problem is, quality, time-consuming journalism, including investigative journalism, is unprofitable and has fallen prey to large for-profit media companies.

Additionally, while fact-checking initiatives are hampered by the dissemination of fake news in many languages, MIL allows any media user to recognize and avoid fake news. In South Korea, after-school programs and youth centers dedicated to different aspects of media and information literacy are extremely common, and curriculum reforms since 2007 are gradually incorporating elements of MIL. In contrast, Southeast Asia appears to be lagging behind in MIL promotion and training.

To meet the global need for media literacy, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) has produced tools ranging from a country assessment framework and policy recommendations to a teaching program and course materials.

Effective use and ownership of these MIL tools by Southeast Asian states would be a victory in the fight against disinformation. Additionally, the advancement of free speech and democracy depends on a media-savvy audience who can easily detect and defeat disinformation.

Each of the solutions to disinformation has a role to play and none should be abandoned. Nevertheless, the most effective weapon against disinformation remains media education, including digital literacy, which should not only be promoted through local initiatives of CSOs and specialized centers, but above all be integrated. as a central element of formal education in each country.



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Media literacy: keys to interpreting media messages http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-keys-to-interpreting-media-messages/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-keys-to-interpreting-media-messages/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 13:11:00 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/media-literacy-keys-to-interpreting-media-messages/ World Media and Information Week is organized by UNESCO each year in October to review and celebrate progress made towards “Media and Information Literacy for All”. The book Media Literacy: Keys to Interpreting Media Messages, authored by Prof. Art Silverblatt Art Silverblatt, Emeritus Professor of Media Communications at Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, Professor Anubhuti […]]]>

World Media and Information Week is organized by UNESCO each year in October to review and celebrate progress made towards “Media and Information Literacy for All”. The book Media Literacy: Keys to Interpreting Media Messages, authored by Prof. Art Silverblatt Art Silverblatt, Emeritus Professor of Media Communications at Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, Professor Anubhuti Yadav, Professor of New Media at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, India and Dr Vedabhyas Kundu, Program Manager at Gandhi Smriti and Darshan Samiti, is a contribution to the worldwide celebrations of MIL from India. This Indian edition was developed as part of the Digital International Media Literacy Education Project (DIMLE).

Media education: Keys to Interpreting Media Messages offers a critical approach that will allow students to better understand the information, messages, ideologies and entertainment factors conveyed by mass communication channels – print, photography, film, radio, television and media. digital. One of the main goals of media education is to enable students
develop a healthy and critical independence from the influence of the media, while maintaining their ability to enjoy interacting with the media and to develop their capacities to create media content.

The first part of the book presents a theoretical framework for the critical analysis of the media text. Part II gives students the opportunity to apply this methodological framework to a variety of media formats: journalism, advertising and political communications. Part III consists of a brief review of mass media issues (violence in the media, media and children, media and social change, and global communications), as well as a discussion of potential outcomes once that people will have acquired a better knowledge of the media.

Prof. Art Silverblatt, Prof. Anubhuti Yadav and Dr VEdabhyas Kudu, with their rich experiences in the field of media and information literacy, have decided to release this print edition as we are all surrounded by misinformation, misinformation and rumors of all kinds. During the pandemic, the world recognized the importance of media and information literacy in tackling the infodemic. This timely initiative is imbued with India’s theoretical perspective of media education and initiatives taken in the field of media education by government and non-governmental organizations in India, where the focus is on building and the deconstruction of media messages. The emphasis is on empowering students through education. This edition includes case studies of the Indian media industry which is very dynamic and complex AUTHORS.


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For American Media Literacy Week, How To Find Trusted Sources, And Other Tips To Become A Savvy News Consumer [editorial] | Our opinion http://www.crestwebmedia.net/for-american-media-literacy-week-how-to-find-trusted-sources-and-other-tips-to-become-a-savvy-news-consumer-editorial-our-opinion/ http://www.crestwebmedia.net/for-american-media-literacy-week-how-to-find-trusted-sources-and-other-tips-to-become-a-savvy-news-consumer-editorial-our-opinion/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/for-american-media-literacy-week-how-to-find-trusted-sources-and-other-tips-to-become-a-savvy-news-consumer-editorial-our-opinion/ THE PROBLEM: This is American Media Literacy Week, which is hosted by the National Association for Media Literacy. As the association’s website explains, this week’s mission is to “highlight the power of media literacy and its essential role in education across the country”. The theme of the week celebrates one of the five defining components […]]]>

THE PROBLEM: This is American Media Literacy Week, which is hosted by the National Association for Media Literacy. As the association’s website explains, this week’s mission is to “highlight the power of media literacy and its essential role in education across the country”. The theme of the week celebrates one of the five defining components of media literacy every day: Access, Analyze, Evaluate, Create and Act. The week is also celebrated by the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association, at which LNP | LancasterOnline is owned.

There is good news and there is bad news.

According to a Pew Research Center survey conducted from July 26 to August 8, just under half (48%) of American adults report receiving news from social media “often” or “sometimes”.

This is clearly the bad news, especially since we now know from Facebook whistleblowers that the social media giant has done little to stem the deluge of harmful disinformation and disinformation that is flooding its platform. .

The good news: This 48%, worrying as it is, marks a drop of 5 percentage points from 2020. Hopefully this marks the start of a trend in the right direction. Because the lies and conspiracy theories that Facebook and other social media platforms are spreading have harmed our democracy, our health in this pandemic, and our children.

Anti-vaccination forces have armed Facebook to spread unwanted science and lies about safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines. Supporters have shared conspiracy theories and lies about the 2020 presidential election in an attempt to undermine democracy. Facebook’s algorithms, particularly on Instagram (which it owns), have transmitted damaging information about diets and eating disorders to vulnerable children.

Lax laws allow social media giants like Facebook to escape the responsibility of maximizing profits at the expense of the public good. As we noted earlier this month, Facebook and other social media platforms are protected by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects online platforms that post third-party content from legal liability. towards them. Thus, Facebook enjoys immunity even when it posts harmful content – and it is incentivized to continue posting that content because it generates profit.

Until Congress corrects this, it’s up to us to fight the spread of misinformation and misinformation on social media. And that’s where Media Literacy Week comes in.

School librarians and other educators are making great strides in teaching media literacy to students, and we greatly appreciate their efforts. They know that teaching children to be good citizens in 2021 is giving them the tools to assess what is right and what is wrong in the information they are bombarded with.

It starts with evaluating the information source itself.

What you are reading now is an op-ed, by definition an opinion piece – not a story. Opinion pages have always been a part of newspapers, but it has become more important than ever to ensure that they and other forms of commentary are clearly defined as opinions.

Opinion staff do not report the news. But LNP | LancasterOnline reporters report the news as objectively as possible, making this newspaper an essential source of information for people who want to know what is happening in Lancaster County.

Information and Opinion Services rigorously check content, as we are responsible for printing only accurate information. We take this responsibility seriously and therefore correct mistakes when we make them, even when we are embarrassed that we have gone wrong. It is a measure of a news source’s credibility – its willingness to correct mistakes. Beware of any source that never admits its mistakes.

Here are some other ways to distinguish really trusted sources from unreliable and even harmful sources. We have offered these tips before, but they are worth repeating.

– Do not rely on one source. This is a fundamental rule of reporting – and it should also be a rule for news consumers.

– Choose reliable sources, such as newspapers like LNP | Lancaster online.

Don’t share the latest news until the basics of the news have been confirmed. A responsible news organization will clarify if certain details are unconfirmed, but not less reliable sources. Remember that early reports, especially of large-scale tragedies, are often incomplete or erroneous.

– Read information critically: does that make sense? Is it supported by facts? Are the sources cited? Does the writer have a perceptible agenda? Is it clear who wrote or created it?

– Think before you share.

– Make sure you distinguish between opinion, satire and current affairs.

– Use fact-checking websites like PolitiFact.com or FactCheck.org. Duke University’s Reporters’ Lab (reporterslab.org/fact-checking) maintains a database of global fact-checking sites.

– Click on the “About” section of a website to check who produces it. Increasingly, political organizations are launching websites that advertise themselves as local news sites but incorporate political messages.

– Beware of “deepfakes” – videos altered by the use of artificial intelligence. They are dangerous because they can appear real.

The Harvard University Library offers these additional suggestions:

– “Consider the source. Weird domain names or websites that end in “lo” are signs you should be wary of. “

– “Look for visual clues: Fake news websites can use sloppy or unprofessional design and abuse ALL CAPITALS.” “

– “If in doubt … ask a librarian.” (That’s a solid suggestion. The best librarians are strong advocates of truth and accuracy.)

And here are some more suggestions from National Association for Media Literacy Education website (which offers great tools for teachers):

– Be careful not to be gullible. “Believing everything you see and hear can create problems if the information you consume is partially or totally inaccurate. It may lead you down the path of trying an unproven cure or it could even influence how you vote in the next election. “

– Make “conscious choices about what type of media you spend time with and how much time you spend with that media. … Remember that not all content is created the same. “

We live in what has been dubbed “the information age” – there are many arriving 24/7. We may not have a choice as to how much. information that bombards us, but we have a choice about what information we believe and share. It can be exhausting to sort the wheat from the chaff. But we have a responsibility, as citizens, to do so.


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To fight disinformation on digital platforms, teach media literacy in schools http://www.crestwebmedia.net/to-fight-disinformation-on-digital-platforms-teach-media-literacy-in-schools/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://www.crestwebmedia.net/to-fight-disinformation-on-digital-platforms-teach-media-literacy-in-schools/ If you want to share your opinion on a cultural, political or personal topic, create an account here and check out our post to find out more. ____ The recent testimony of the Facebook whistleblower Francis Haugen in the US Senate did not reveal much information that most observers of the current disinformation crisis did […]]]>

If you want to share your opinion on a cultural, political or personal topic, create an account here and check out our post to find out more.

____

The recent testimony of the Facebook whistleblower Francis Haugen in the US Senate did not reveal much information that most observers of the current disinformation crisis did not already suspect. Instead, his testimony underscored the depth of the disinformation crisis that Facebook has helped accelerate. His testimony was remarkable for its specificity and clarity in describing the problem and calling for action.

It remains to be seen whether political leaders who have been slow to understand the problem will pick up the torch and come up with regulations to tackle the disinformation crisis. With many American counties to announce medical misinformation a public health crisis due to the increase in deaths from COVID and misinformation about electoral fraud leading to the January 6 coup attempt, the stakes could not be higher.

One step towards solving this problem is to introduce media literacy skills as a mandatory addition to school curricula. This would allow the next generation to be better consumers of information. People familiar with the media can better decode the media messages they receive, apply critical thinking, and discern the difference between real journalism and propaganda.

Over the past two decades, the traditional model of news media has fractured and digital platforms increasingly occupy a significant share of the media market. These include more traditional news formats, but also memes, viral videos, and social media posts. Young people are increasingly absorbing information on these platforms. Increasing their media literacy would allow them to engage more securely with the information they interact with and to think critically about the source of the information. It would also train them to decipher between journalism, opinion, sponsored content and propaganda.

Media literacy skills are the essential complement to social studies in the digital age. Like Thomas Jefferson noted, “An educated citizenship is an essential condition for our survival as a free people.” We know from our lived experience that disinformation weakens democracy. Politicians can use disinformation as a weapon to stoke resentment and bogus culture wars while eroding societal norms.

Facebook insiders have sounded the alarm saying that the company puts profits before people. Some have argued that the onus to discern disinformation lies with the users of these platforms. They say social media platforms simply provide a platform for the free exchange of ideas, according to the argument. This argument ignores the role these platforms play in amplifying harmful content.

Facebook’s algorithms amplify content designed to elicit strong emotions like outrage, meant to keep users engaged. Users are not well equipped to deal with very sophisticated algorithms designed to trigger their emotions. Media literacy alone will not solve this problem, but it is a crucial step in tackling the crisis.

Digital platforms like Facebook have proven to be reluctant or unable to put in place the appropriate safeguards to moderate the spread of disinformation. Politicians have also shown a lack of political will and fail to introduce regulations to bring about real change. In the face of this inaction, the least we can do as a society is to equip the next generation with the tools and skills to deal with the torrent of disinformation we know they will face.


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